Duke of Cornwall's Volunteers

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Reference WMO216811

Address:

St La's Church

St Andrew's Street

St Ives

TR26 1AH

England

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Status: On original site
Type: Non freestanding
Location: Internal
Setting: Inside a building - public/private
Description: Board/Plaque/ Tablet
Materials:
  • Glass Stained Glass
Lettering: Inscribed on a plaque
Conflicts:
  • Non-Specific Conflict
About the memorial: Marble, rectangular plaque with inscription. Associated three-light, stained glass window and additional brass, ornate plaque. The window shows images of St Alban, St George and St Martin. The brass plaque is rectangular with a pedimented top. It has elaborate patterning around the edges and incorporates several sets of the Prince of Wales feathers and a Regimental badge.
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Marble plaque - To the glory of God and to the memory of those members of No. 13 Company Duke of Cornwall's RGA Volunteers and of No. 5 Company Duke of Cornwall's RGA Territorials who have departed hence. This window was erected 26 January 1913 from the income of funds invested by the representatives of Robert Snaith Hichens first commanding officer of the 11th Battery Duke of Cornwall's Artillery Volunteers formed September 1860 to whose memory and to the memory of whose comrades the adjoining tablet was placed December 1869.Window - Put on the whole armour of God. Brass Plaque - To the glory of God and to the common memory (as God calls each hence) of those who together first formed the 11th (St Ives) Battery, Duke of Cornwall's Volunteer Artillery. This brass has been engraved and placed in the Trenwith Aisle of this church by the surviving brothers of Robert Snaith Hichens (the first commanding officer of the Battery) in remembrance of his constant sympathy with the Corps and in grateful acknowledgement of the affectionate regard ever shown towards him by his former comrades.

There are 25 names on the brass plaque but they are too high in the church to be deciphered. They record deaths from 1863 to 1881.

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