Captain Frederick John Walker CB DSO and 3 Bars RN


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Reference WMO245271

Address:

Western Approaches Museum

Derby House

Rumford Street

Liverpool

L2 8SZ

England

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Status: On original site
Type: Freestanding
Location: Internal
Setting: Inside a building - public/private
Description: Figure sculpture
Materials:
  • Unknown Unknown
Lettering: Other
Conflicts:
  • Second World War (1939-1945)
About the memorial: figurative sculpture depicting Capt. Walker, accompanied by a 2 page printed tribute.
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CAPTAIN FREDERIC JOHN WALKER/ C.B. D.S.O. AND THREE BARS R.N./ 'Captain Walker, more than any other, won the/ Battle of the Atlantic. His methods had amazing/ success and more than any other factor gave the/ Royal Navy supremacy. It is only now that we/ have learned the full impact he had on the enemy./ No tribute could be too high for the work he carried/ out. This ace killer of submarines not only showed/ what mastery of this art could do, but by his/ example infected all those concerned with him in/ this business with the same enthusiasm'/ An Admiralty communique issued in 1950./ Liverpool sculptor Alan Curran has/ depicted Captain Walker in his favourite/ sea rig. A multi-coloured patchwork/ leather waistcoat, which his daughter/ Gillian still has, and an old roll-necked pullover. Corned beef sandwich in hand./ The constant strain of being in the fight for/ longer than any other officer afloat was relentlessly taking its toll of mind and body./ With eighteen warships, including Carriers,/ under his command there was neither rest/ nor sleep for Captain Walker. In those rare moments when he could stagger down to/ his bunk for a brief, restless hour laying/ full-dressed in soaked clothes, water seeped/ in through leaks, forming puddles in the blankets./ He could and did stay on the bridge longer/ than any of the younger men. As a result he/ was killing himself, gradually but inevitably./ He died of over strain, over work and war/ weariness; body and mind had been driven/ beyond all normal limits and in the service of his/ country. 'Victory has been won and should be/ won by such as he. May there never/ be wanting in this realm a succession/ of men of like spirit in discipline,/ imagination and valour, humble and/ unafraid. Not dust nor the light weight/ of stone, but all the sea of the Western/ Approaches shall be his tomb'/ Admiral Sir Max Horton

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