Great War Centennial Corner

Submit a new image

Reference WMO/275980

Address:

Cedars Park

Theobalds Lane

Cheshunt

Hertfordshire

EN88RU

England

Open large map
Edit memorial name, location & address
Status: On original site
Type: Non freestanding
Location: External
Setting: Within a garden/park/churchyard/enclosure/Marketplace
Description: Vehicle
Materials:
  • Metal Bronze
Conflicts:
  • First World War (1914-1918)
About the memorial: This excellent replica Tank was made for film work at Pinewood Studios (Dave Roberts Engineering), being the inspiration of Tony Cooke and Kevin Jepson, Military Vehicle Hobbyist Builders. They named their creation ‘Frank’. The concrete plinth on which the Tank sits was built to display a Tank given to Cheshunt Council in 1921 by the National War Savings Committee. Cheshunt raised a considerable amount of money to support the War Effort and was one of 265 towns in England and Wales rewarded with a Presentation Tank. The Tank was a 'top-draw sledgehauler', designed to pull a supply trailer carrying food, fuel and ammunition. It was driven from College Road to Cedars Park in a special ceremony which the whole town gathered to enjoy. The Tank was sold for scrap in 1940 for 27 pounds, 16 shillings and 10 pence - these monies supported the Second World War Effort. The Tank is a 1917 British 'Male' Mk IV with Cannons and Machine Guns. These Presentation Tanks were primarily ‘Female’ versions with Machine Guns only, but including 30 ‘Males’. Our Tank is one of only two remaining on their original plinths (one in Ashford). Tank Trials were held at Hatfield Park in 1916 with ground obstacle work by 3 (Mid.Herts) Battalion of the Hertfordshire Regiment. The development of the Tank was a means of breaking Trench Warfare stalemate to minimise severe losses being experienced by the BEF and only became possible through the strong support of Winston Churchill, the First Sea Lord, in 1915 (originally called ‘Landships’ but ‘Tank’ evolved as a cover, suggesting ‘Water Carriers’). In battle, the Tanks worked in Sections of three - ‘Male’ centred with ‘Females’ flanking. The bronze of a Rifle Brigade Memorial Soldier - all of eight foot tall - was put in Cedars Park to remember all those from The Great War (1914 to 1918) who were lost - some 1,000,000 from the British Empire. There were additionally over 2,000,000 wounded, many of whom succumbed to their injuries or were permanently disabled. We should also not forget the military and civilians who died clearing the battlefields, especially in Flanders and the Somme, of munitions and war detritus post-war. The following soldier is thought to have been the youngest volunteer recruit from the Broxbourne District during the Great War. Rifleman 1687 William Ernest Taylor UGLOW (17 years old) of 1/9 Battalion of the Queen Victoria Rifle Brigade (Territorials) who landed in France in August 1914 as part of the initial British Expeditionary Force of 100,000, who were sent to support France and Belgium against the invasion by the Imperial German Army according to treaty. Rifleman Uglow would have joined them, after training, probably just before their Action on the Western Front at Wulverghem, following the first Battle of Ypres (the Germans being on much higher ground along the Messines Ridge, south of Ypres (The Salient) and between Kemmel in France, and Messines in Belgium). He is listed as being Killed in Action on 1st January 1915, along with over 40 others of his battalion, through an artillery bombardment from Hooge heights. There is ‘No Known Grave’ for William, and therefore he is Commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial Arch (to nearly 55,000) at the eastern Gate and Wall of Ypres (Ieper) on Panel 54 and is annotated as a Private. He was the son of William Ernest and Florence Uglow.
Edit memorial details
Report this condition update

View more details

Grants to support the repair and conservation of war memorials are available from the charity War Memorials Trust if it has raised funds. Support is focused on war memorials in Very bad or Poor condition or where there is a serious Concern.

Before applying for a grant you should read the advice available on War Memorials Trust`s website. The What we can and cannot fund helpsheet explains what types of work the charity can fund.

If you believe your project is eligible for a grant you should complete the Pre-application enquiry form. You will need to be registered and logged in to complete this.

The Pre-application enquiry form is a series of questions to see if your project is eligible. If it is, you will need to provide further details and submit current colour photographs of the war memorial in either a png, gif, jpg or jpeg format.

You can save your Pre-application enquiry form as you go along. Once submitted War Memorials Trust will respond.

Please be aware that a summary of your enquiry, without your contact details, will appear on this page once submitted. This ensures others are aware that an enquiry has been made and can read the response to avoid duplicate enquiries. Information provided by you to us will be used for the purpose of managing the grant enquiry, for further details please read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy .

As a charity, War Memorials Trust relies on voluntary donations and every contribution, no matter how large or small, makes a really big difference to our work. Your donation will help protect and conserve war memorials for future generations so please support War Memorials Trust’s work.

None

None

Information Required

Information Required

Information Required

Information Required

Information Required

Information Required

Information Required